2016 Honor Student Presentations

April 19th, 2016

 Computer Science Department 2016 Honor Presentations

April 25 & April 26

King 243 4:30 -6:00 p.m.

Monday April 25

4:30 Conrad Schloer

5:00  Max Grusky

5:30 Nathan Klein

Tuesday, April 26

4:30  Sam Rossin

5:00  James Quintana

5:30 Gabriel Appleby

Join us for the presentations and refreshments

Graduate School for Computer Science April 7 4:30

March 18th, 2016

Abby Marsh, Carnegie Mellon Graduate Student and Oberlin College 2013 Alumni  will talk about her Graduate School research and life as a graduate student.

Are you considering graduate school? Do you wonder what computer science research looks like?  computer science is an extremely diverse discipline, containing many exciting research areas, and a doctoral graduate degree is the best way to begin your research career.  This talk will give an overview of different fields in computer science research, and discuss human-computer interaction (HCI) research in depth. We will cover the graduate school experience, especially what life is like for a PhD student, the expectations of grad school, and the thrilling world of publishing research.  Students are encouraged to ask questions.  Join us on Thursday, April 7 4:00 for refreshments followed by the talk at 4:30 in King 239

 

Pure Laziness: An Intro to the Haskell Programming Language

March 3rd, 2016

Tuesday, March 15, 2016 4:30 King 239
Join us for a talk with Richard Townsend; Columbia University:
Pure Laziness: An intro to the Haskell Programming Language

High-level programming languages such as Python and Java increase programmer productivity by abstracting away low-level details like memory management and computer architecture. However, most of these languages still force the programmer to think like a computer; we must tell the computer exactly how to solve a problem via ordered sequences of statements and explicit looping constructs. Functional languages like Haskell provide an alternative approach: instead of telling the computer how to perform a computation, you simply describe the computation itself and let the language do the work. This approach leads to more intuitive programs and higher programmer productivity in the long run. My talk will serve as an accessible introduction to the Haskell language, covering its clean syntax, lazy semantics, and pure functional model. My hope is to engender interest in other programming styles, and show that learning a vastly different programming language can lead to new problem solving techniques applicable throughout a computer scientist’s career.

Refreshments at 4:00 in King 225

 

 

Monday, Oct 12 Job Searches and Internships

October 5th, 2015

Join us for a Pizza Lunch talk presented by Career Services Monday, Oct 12

Noon-1:00 p.m. King 239

CSCI Faculty will present helpful information and tips.

Career Services will present and demo available job search databases.

Sign up in the CSCI office to attend by Friday, Oct 9

Talk with Bryan Alexander

March 9th, 2015

The CS Department will be hosting a talk for majors with Bryan Alexander (http://bryanalexander.org/) this Friday, March 13 on “The future of Gaming and Mobile Technologies, and the Effect on CS Education”

Bryan Alexander

LaFentres ’14 presents at Tapia 2015

February 22nd, 2015

Last week during the ACM Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing, recent alumna Krista LaFentres ’14 presented a poster on her work with Professor Cynthia Taylor on The Use and Misuse of Disposable Email.

LaFentres-Tapia-2015

Job Search info session for CSCI students

October 1st, 2014

Thinking about pursuing a CS job, winter term, or internship in the future?

Join us Tuesday, Oct 7 from 12:15-1:15pm in King 337 to meet with CS faculty and Richard Berman from Oberlin’s Career Center to talk about:

  • Strategies for finding positions
  • What industries employ computer scientists
  • CS-related jobs that aren’t just software engineering
  • Reaching out to CS alumni
  • Deciding between grad school vs. industry
  • When to start looking for jobs
  • How the faculty and staff at Oberlin can help you

RSVP by Monday with Jackie in King 223 and sign up for pizza!

more jobs than students

More jobs than students in CS

Putting Healthcare in Your Hands

April 9th, 2014

Join us on Friday, April 9 for a 12-1pm talk by Beenish Chaudhry entitled: “Putting Healthcare in Your Hands” in King 235.

Abstract: Our healthcare system is undergoing a seismic shift that is breaking the old information asymmetry – where doctors had all the information and patients had very little – now technology is being used to collect data to give patients an easy way to access key facts and gain knowledge for decisions about health. While we know how to target this information for the affluent and their lifestyles, what are we doing for those with low socioeconomic background? In this talk, you will learn about technology design challenges and solutions for this population, and what needs to be done in the future.

Women in STEM Faculty Panel

February 11th, 2014

Roots & STEM logoJoin professors Kate Jones-Smith (physics & astronomy), Chelsea Martinez (chemistry), Cynthia Taylor (computer science), and Leslie Kwakye (neuroscience) for a panel discussion on their careers in the sciences.

We invite scientists and non-scientists alike to attend and participate in what we hope will be an interesting, informative, and fun event.

When: Tuesday, February 11 at 4:45pm to 6:00pm

Where: Norman C. Craig Lecture Hall, Science Center

The session is part of the Roots & STEM events series exploring the human makeup of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

https://calendar.oberlin.edu/event/women_in_stem_panel_part_2

An Empirical View of DNS Complexity and Security

January 29th, 2014

Mark Allman, International Computer Science Institute will give a talk.  The Domain Name System (DNS) is a crucial piece of the Internet’s fabric, charged with mapping human-friendly names into network addresses.  This talk highlights several recent projects that aim to explore and understand how the modern DNS ecosystem has organically developed.  We will first tackle the complexity of the system and then illustrate how that complexity causes potential security vulnerabilities.  Finally, we will briefly sketch several possible mitigations to these security issues– which is the subject of ongoing work.

FEB. 11,  12:20 p.m. King 239 Refreshments will be served.